May 13

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Thinking Several Moves Ahead

Chess is a game that's always fascinated me. Master chess players, even more so.

When you play chess, you have to think at least one move ahead. Taking the opponent's knight might seem exciting in the moment. But only until the opponent takes your queen on the next move.

Master chess players don't think one move ahead. They don't even think a few moves ahead. They think more like 20 or 30 moves ahead. They know the lay of the land, and all its possibilities.

That's why one chess master can play against 30 chess hobbyists at once, and win every game.

We can learn a lot from the game of chess.

When it comes to creating, practicing, and working, we're familiar with the obstacles. In fact, we're often hindered by the same obstacles again and again. Like Groundhog Day.

Yet somehow, we're still surprised every time it happens.

But when you plan ahead for those obstacles, you can do something about it, and move forward.

When you contemplate the obstacles no one else considers, you can have an advantage.

When you think several moves ahead, you can create a plan of action. Make a difference.

Or even change the world.

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For parents, students, and anyone else who believes that music can and should be a meaningful part of everyone's life.

About Jonathan Roberts

I am the founder and director of the South Shore Piano School, and I have been teaching the piano for nearly 20 years. My work centers around bringing music to the lives of kids, parents, and adults in an enriching, meaningful way. At the South Shore Piano School, my incredible colleagues and I accomplish this through skill-based teaching, community, and an innovative, people-first business model. You can read more about me here.


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